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Press releases

  • Peter N. Robinson bridges the gap between data science and applied precision medicine

    In January 2024, Prof. Peter N. Robinson will take up an Alexander von Humboldt Professorship for Artificial Intelligence at the Berlin Institute of Health at Charité (BIH). Robinson, a bioinformatician, is a pioneer in the computational genome and phenotype analysis of genetic diseases. His major work has been the development of the Human…

  • Leif Ludwig is named EMBO Young Investigator

    The European Molecular Biology Organization has selected Leif. S. Ludwig from the Berlin Institute of Health at Charité (BIH) and the Max Delbrück Center to become an EMBO Young Investigator. The program provides support to outstanding young life scientists.

  • Charité BIH InnovationDigital Labs

    TimeTeller® GmbH, Kiso Health and UniWearables receive start-up prize

    Twice a year, the start-up competition Gründungswettbewerb – Digitale Innovationen by the Federal Ministry for Economic Affairs and Climate Protection's (BMWK) honors the best ideas of innovative start-ups that are based on digital technologies. The award supports start-ups in the early stages and emphasizes their key role as drivers of innovation…

  • Charité BIH Innovation

    PoroUS GmbH wins the Berlin Brandenburg Innovation Award 2023

    With its innovative ultrasound procedure, the spin-off PoroUS GmbH, in which Charité holds a stake via its technology service provider Ascenion GmbH, enables cost-effective, X-ray-free and precise early detection of osteoporosis. The Potsdam-based start-up, led by Dr Julia Eschenbrenner (CEO), Jonas Massmann (CTO) and Charité employee Prof Dr Kay…

  • A new hub for cutting-edge cancer care

    From 2024, the Federal Government and the State of Berlin will fund the establishment of the National Center for Tumor Diseases (NCT) Berlin. The new site is a cooperation between DKFZ and Charité, BIH, and Max Delbrück Center aimed at closely integrating clinical and translational cancer research.

  • How stem cells and immune cells communicate - Lisec Artz Award for Simon Haas

    Blood cancer is often driven by mutations in stem cells, which are key target cells in the search for innovative early-stage therapies. Dr. Simon Haas, head of a lab within the joint research focus of the Berlin Institute of Health at Charité (BIH), Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin, and the Max Delbrück Center, is seeking to understand…

  • First Genetic Causes of Raynaud’s Phenomenon Discovered

    Two to five percent of all people are affected by Raynaud's phenomenon: In cold or stressful conditions, the small blood vessels that supply the skin constrict and the fingers or toes turn white. First described by Maurice Raynaud in 1862, scientists from the Berlin Institute of Health at the Charité (BIH), together with colleagues from the United…

  • Coronavirus vaccination: body builds immune memory in organs

    One shot in the arm, and the whole body is protected. But how? For one thing, the immune system produces antibodies and cells that patrol the entire organism by traveling through the bloodstream. On the other hand, the body builds up a local immune memory in various organs. This is shown by a recent study of the Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin…

  • Liver fibrosis: giant cells step in to compensate for impaired immune function

    A team of researchers has uncovered a previously unknown compensatory mechanism found in liver disease. If Kupffer cells (KCs), a specific kind of immune cells found in the liver, become impaired by tissue scarring, immune cells originating in the bone marrow flow to the organ, where they form larger cell clusters to perform the same function.…

  • Genes as a key to new therapies: Maik Pietzner receives ERC Starting Grant

    In the fight against many common diseases, there is a huge need for safe and effective drugs. Maik Pietzner, a group leader in the Computational Medicine Group at the Berlin Institute of Health at Charité (BIH), sees genes as a key to developing new therapies, because most diseases have a genetic background. Using a sophisticated strategy that…

  • Rare kidney disease is genetically decoded

    Bartter syndrome type 3 is the result of several structural variants in the genome. By using long-read sequencing, Janine Altmüller and her team from the Max Delbrück Center, the Berlin Institute of Health at Charité (BIH) and University Hospital Cologne mapped out the rare disease in unprecedented detail. They have now reported their findings in…

  •  Illustration of the SARS-CoV-2 spike

    Low binding affinity improves vaccine efficacy

    Conventional vaccines usually contain antigens – components of the respective pathogens – that bind to receptors on the surface of their target cells in order to trigger the disease. Scientists at the Berlin Institute of Health at Charité (BIH) and the Max Delbrück Center have now discovered that antigen variants with low receptor binding can be…

  • T cells require healthy “power plants”

    All cells have their own power plants, called mitochondria. There are often more than 100 mitochondria per cell and each possesses their own genome, which in turn contains genes responsible for energy production. If errors creep into these genes, this can cause problems in the cell and result in diseases. Scientists from the Berlin Institute of…

  • DNA analysis reveals risk of post-meal insulin resistance

    Scientists from the Berlin Institute of Health at Charité (BIH), along with colleagues from the United Kingdom, have found clues as to how we maintain constant blood sugar levels after we have eaten. Analyzing the DNA of nearly 55,000 participants from different studies, they identified ten genomic regions containing genetic variants responsible…

  • Intelligent brains take longer to solve difficult problems

    Do intelligent people think faster? Researchers at the BIH and Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin, together with a colleague from Barcelona, made the surprising finding that participants with higher intelligence scores were only quicker when tackling simple tasks, while they took longer to solve difficult problems than subjects with lower IQ…

  • Digital Labs

    TimeTeller reads your inner clock: Tenth spin-off of the BIH Digital Health Accelerator pinpoints the best time to exercise, sleep and take medicine

    An interdisciplinary team led by Prof. Angela Relógio, a scientist at Charité’s Molecular Cancer Research Center (MKFZ) and Institute for Theoretical Biology and the MSH Medical School Hamburg, has developed a non-invasive method for profiling a person’s unique circadian rhythm. Starting with a simple saliva sample, the team of experts can create a…

  • Synthetic DNA to reveal genetic switches: ERC Starting Grant for Daniel Ibrahim

    We already know in great detail how proteins are encoded in the DNA sequence of our genes. However, our understanding how one gene is active in one cell, but inactive in another is much more limited. While it's clear that the information for this gene activity is also “programmed” in DNA, we have yet to crack the regulatory code. Daniel Ibrahim, a…

  • Are autoantibodies in COVID-19 less harmful than previously thought?

    Critically ill COVID-19 patients often have antibodies in their blood that bind to the body’s own structures, so-called autoantibodies. Scientists from the BIH at Charité and the Max Delbrück Center have now discovered that these autoantibodies frequently bind to not just one but multiple targets. This surprising finding calls into question the…

  • Using bone marrow stromal cells instead of transplantation

    Bone is the second most commonly transplanted tissue after blood, with about two million bone transplants performed worldwide each year – but often with only moderate therapeutic success. Cell-based therapies could provide an alternative approach to transplantation. Together with colleagues from Paracelsus Medical Private University (PMU) Salzburg,…

  • QUEST Center

    Transparency for clinical trials

    Clinical trials are the “backbone of evidence-based medicine”: This is where new drugs and treatments are tested on humans for the first time. The results of such trials are therefore highly relevant. But unfortunately many clinical trial results from German universities are not published at all or are registered too late – and if they are…

  • Monkeypox or not? An app helps with decision support

    An APP can help in deciding whether conspicuous skin changes are an infection with the monkeypox virus: The user answers a questionnaire and uploads a photo of the skin change. The APP uses artificial intelligence (AI) methods for an initial assessment and provides users with relevant information on possible next steps, e.g. testing or vaccination,…

  • Rare Disease Day: High hopes for gene therapy

    February 28, 2023 is Rare Disease Day. So-called rare diseases afflict about 4 million people in Germany alone – and some 350 million people globally. Most of these rare diseases lack effective treatments and are fully or partially genetically determined. But new developments in gene- and cell-based therapies are offering new hope. The Berlin…

  • Why migraine frequently occurs during menstruation

    When women suffer migraine attacks, it is often just before or during their monthly period. A team of researchers from Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin has now identified a possible explanation. According to their study, published in the journal Neurology,* women who experience migraines have higher levels of CGRP during menstruation. CGRP is a…

  • How does triple combination therapy work against cystic fibrosis? Research project at the BIH and Charité examines its impact at the cellular level

    For a few years now, a triple combination therapy with elexacaftor, tezacaftor, and ivacaftor has been available for cystic fibrosis patients. Called CFTR modulator therapy, it responds well in most patients, but even individuals with the same CFTR gene mutation may experience different treatment responses. The reasons for this are now being…

  • Study in Nature discovers causal mechanism behind rare hereditary diseases

    Researchers from Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin, the Max Planck Institute for Molecular Genetics (MPIMG), and the University Hospital Schleswig-Holstein (UKSH) have investigated in detail how BPTA syndrome, an extremely rare hereditary condition, arises. A change in the charge of a protein disrupts cellular self-organization, resulting in a…

  • Digital Labs

    Recovery Cat develops software for psychiatric treatment

    In order to improve care for about six million people with severe mental illnesses in Germany, a digital platform has been developed by members of the Department of Psychiatry and Neurosciences at Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin at Campus Charité Mitte. The platform, called Recovery Cat, provides patients with individualized therapy plans and…

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Katharina Kalhoff: +49 1515 7579574

Ole Kamm: +49 1522 5610126

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