Individual coaching sessions for early- and mid-career women* scientists

This coaching service aims to support participating scientists in their career decisions by providing an outside perspective. It also seeks to advise them on a third-party funding strategy and, if applicable, provide them with feedback on an application exposé. The goal here is not to provide an assessment of the subject and content matter, but to offer targeted feedback on the structure, development, and formal aspects of the research exposé from a generalist evaluator’s perspective.

Important elements of the coaching sessions include:

  • Developing short and medium-term career goals and a long-term career plan
  • Using these goals to determine an appropriate funding profile
  • Providing résumé feedback
  • Reviewing research proposals from an evaluator’s perspective (if applicable)

Language:

English/German

About the coach:

Dr. Beate Scholz is the managing director of Scholz CTC GmbH, where she works with various international universities, research institutions, and scientific organizations as a strategy consultant, moderator, instructor, and coach. She also has twelve years of experience at the German Research Foundation (DFG), where she worked until summer 2009. Beate Scholz played a key role in developing the Graduate Schools program as part of the Excellence Initiative. She gained extensive operational and evaluation experience through managing the Research Training Groups program and European Young Investigator Award, and created an international strategy platform – the European Network for Research Careers – that promotes exchange and joint initiatives between international scientific organizations.

Women*

We chose the word women* in order to encompass women, as well as trans*, inter*, non-binary and queer folk, who choose to identify with womankind. There is a live debate in society right now regarding whether inclusion within the category of ‘woman’ is a matter of biological sex, or gender. To put it simplistically, if being a woman relates to sex, this limits the opportunities for those who were not born female to self-identify as a woman. If being a woman is a matter of gender identity, this widens the opportunity for individuals to self-define as a woman, regardless of their appearance, the sex in which they were born, or other characteristics.